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Flash Mob - definitions

The dictionary definitions of Flash and Mob. Something to think about and mull over!

flash
v. flashed, flash’ing, flash’es
v. intr.
To burst forth into or as if into flame.
To give off light or be lighted in sudden or intermittent bursts.
To appear or occur suddenly: The image flashed onto the screen.
To move or proceed rapidly: The cars flashed by.
To hang up a phone line momentarily, as when using call waiting.
Slang. To think of or remember something suddenly: flashed on that time we got caught in the storm.
Slang. To expose oneself in an indecent manner.

v. tr.
To cause (light) to appear suddenly or in intermittent bursts.
To cause to burst into flame.
To reflect (light).
To cause to reflect light from (a surface).
To make known or signal by flashing lights.
To communicate or display at great speed: flashed the news to the world capitals.
To exhibit briefly.
To hang up (a phone line) momentarily, as when using call waiting.
To display ostentatiously; flaunt.
To fill suddenly with water.
To cover with a thin protective layer.

n.
A sudden, brief, intense display of light.
A sudden perception: a flash of insight.
A split second; an instant: I’ll be on my way in a flash.
A brief news dispatch or transmission.
Slang. Gaudy or ostentatious display: ‘The antique flash and trash of an older southern California have given way to a sleeker age of cultural hip’ (Newsweek).
A flashlight.
Instantaneous illumination for photography: photograph by flash.
A device, such as a flashbulb, flashgun, or flash lamp, used to produce such illumination.
Slang. The pleasurable sensation that accompanies the use of a drug; a rush.
Obsolete. The language or cant of thieves, tramps, or underworld figures.

adj.
Happening suddenly or very quickly: flash freezing.
Slang. Ostentatious; showy: a flash car.
Of or relating to figures of quarterly economic growth released by the government and subject to later revision.
Of or relating to photography using instantaneous illumination.
Of or relating to thieves, swindlers, and underworld figures.

Idiom:
flash in the pan
One that promises great success but fails.

[Middle English flashen ,to splash , variant of flasken ,of imitative origin .]
Synonyms: flash, gleam, glance, 1glint, sparkle, glitter, glisten, shimmer, glimmer, twinkle, scintillate
These verbs mean to send forth light. Flash refers to a sudden and brilliant but short-lived outburst of light: A bolt of lightning flashed across the horizon. Gleam implies transient or constant light that often appears against a dark background: ‘The light gleams an instant, then it’s night once more’ (Samuel Beckett). Glance refers most often to light reflected obliquely: Moonlight glanced off the windows of the darkened building. Glint applies to briefly gleaming or flashing light: Rays of sun glinted among the autumn leaves. Sparkle suggests a rapid succession of little flashes of high brilliance ( crystal glasses sparkling in the candlelight ), and glitter, a similar succession of even greater intensity ( jewels glittering in the display case ). To glisten is to shine with a sparkling luster: The snow glistened in the dawn light. Shimmer means to shine with a soft, tremulous light: ‘Everything about her shimmered and glimmered softly, as if her dress had been woven out of candle-beams’ (Edith Wharton). Glimmer refers to faint, fleeting light: ‘On the French coast, the light/Gleams, and is gone; the cliffs of England stand,/Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay’ (Matthew Arnold). To twinkle is to shine with quick, intermittent flashes or gleams: ‘a few stars, twinkling faintly in the deep blue of the night sky’ (Hugh Walpole). Scintillate is applied to what flashes as if emitting sparks in a continuous stream: ‘ammonium chloride… depositing minute scintillating crystals on the windowpanes’ (Primo Levai). See also synonyms at moment


Source :The American Heritage’ Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright ’ 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


mob
n.
A large disorderly crowd or throng. See Synonyms at crowd1.
The mass of common people; the populace.
Informal.
An organized gang of criminals; a crime syndicate.
often Mob Organized crime. Often used with the: a murder suspect with links to the Mob.
An indiscriminate or loosely associated group of persons or things: a mob of boats in the harbor.
Australian. A flock or herd of animals.

tr.v. mobbed, mob’bing, mobs
To crowd around and jostle or annoy, especially in anger or excessive enthusiasm: Eager fans mobbed the popular singer.
To crowd into: Visitors mobbed the fairgrounds.
To attack in large numbers; overwhelm: The quarterback was mobbed by the defensive line.

————————————————————————————————————————
[Short for mobile, from Latin mbile (vulgus), fickle (crowd), neuter of mbilis. See mobile.]
————————————————————————————————————————
mobbish adj.
mobbish’ly adv.
Source: The American Heritage’ Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright ’ 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


mob
Mob, n. [See Mobcap.] A mobcap.—Goldsmith.
Source: Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, ’ 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.

mob
Mob, v. t. To wrap up in, or cover with, a cowl. [R.]
Source: Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, ’ 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.


mob
Mob, n. [L. mobile vulgus, the movable common people. See Mobile, n.] 1. The lower classes of a community; the populace, or the lowest part of it.

A cluster of mob were making themselves merry with their betters.—Addison.

2. Hence: A throng; a rabble; esp., an unlawful or riotous assembly; a disorderly crowd.

The mob of gentlemen who wrote with ease.—Pope.

Had every Athenian citizen been a Socrates, every Athenian assembly would still have been a mob.—Madison.

Confused by brainless mobs.—Tennyson.

Mob law, law administered by the mob; lynch law.

Swell mob, well dressed thieves and swindlers, regarded collectively. [Slang]—Dickens.
Source: Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, ’ 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.


mob
Mob, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Mobbed; p. pr. & vb. n. Mobbing.] To crowd about, as a mob, and attack or annoy; as, to mob a house or a person.
Source: Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, ’ 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.


mob
adj : characteristic of a mob; disorderly or lawless; “mob rule”; “fanned mounting tension into mobbish terrorizing”; “moblike mentality” [syn: mobbish, moblike] n 1: a disorderly crowd of people [syn: rabble, rout] 2: a loose affiliation of gangsters in charge of organized criminal activities [syn: syndicate] 3: an association of criminals; “police tried to break up the gang”; “a pack of thieves” [syn: gang, pack, ring] v : press tightly together or cram; “The crowd packed the auditorium” [syn: throng, pack, pile, jam]
Source: WordNet ’ 1.6, ’ 1997 Princeton University

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